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UN warns over Gaza food blockade

The UN in the Gaza Strip says it will run out of food aid in two days unless Israel’s blockade – which it describes as “shameful and unacceptable” – eases.

Gaza Again Plunged into Darkness, Hunger as Israel Blocks Fuel, Food to Suffering Population

Democracy Now!: Gaza’s humanitarian crisis has worsened in the aftermath of Israel’s latest blockade of fuel and food. We speak to Diana Buttu, a former lawyer for the Palestinian Authority, and Reverend Edwin “Eddie” Makue of the South African Council of Churches, a veteran of South Africa’s apartheid struggle. They are on an “anti-apartheid” speaking tour across the US for the next two weeks.

Help ban cluster bombs!

On December 3, 2008, a new treaty will open for signature: the Convention on Cluster Munitions. After landmines, cluster munitions pose the greatest risk to civilians, causing more civilian casualties in Iraq in 2003 and Kosovo in 1999 than any other weapon system. Yet so far, Canada has not declared that it intends to sign the treaty on this historic day.

Sign the petition to ban cluster bombs!

Rally to Oppose P3s

RALLY TO OPPOSE THE LIBERAL GOVERNMENT PLAN TO BUILD P3 SCHOOLS, COURT HOUSES AND A HOSPITAL

THE TIME AS COME FOR NEW BRUNSWICKERS TO SAY NO TO P3’S

WHEN: On November 25, 2008 (at the opening of the Legislative Assembly)

WHERE: Join us at 2:30 pm at Officers’ Square ­we will march on the Legislative Assembly

Organized by: CUPE NB

RALLIEMENT POUR S’OPPOSER AUX PROJETS DE PARTENARIAT PUBLIC-PRIVÉ DU GOUVERNEMENT LIBÉRAL POUR LA CONSTRUCTION D’ÉCOLES, DE PALAIS DE JUSTICE ET D’UN HÔPITAL

LE TEMPS EST VENU POUR LES GENS DU NOUVEAU-BRUNSWICK DE DIRE NON AUX PPP

QUAND : Le 25 novembre 2008 (à l‘ouverture de l’Assemblée législative)
OÙ : Venez nous rejoindre à 14h30 au Officers’ Square ­nous marcherons à l’Assemblée législative

SCFP N-B

A soldier’s sad story, one of a number

Matthew Charles Keddy used to be a happy young man who was excited about his life. But according to his family that was before the 25-year-old Canadian Forces Base Gagetown soldier served in Afghanistan. He hasn’t been the same since his return from the war-torn country. He has suffered depression and anxiety, a suicide attempt, and in the summer he assaulted a woman who was then his girlfriend.

Meanwhile, Fredericton psychologists Robin Geneau and Joyce Belliveau told the committee that services to treat soldiers at the base who are suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder are in disarray and carried out by unqualified mental health workers.

Reckless Soldiers, Slappers and Smack

The only winners emerging from Afghanistan these days are the drug barons who preside over the world’s largest heroin trade and the pimps who control the Chinese prostitutes operating from the scores of bordellos and brothels which have emerged since the US military occupation.

German nuclear waste shipment sparks fury

On Saturday, thousands of people demonstrated near the nuclear waste disposal centre at Gorleben. About 14,000 demonstrators converged on the site, police said, with protest organisers saying that 16,000 people had turned out.

Fresh fighting in eastern DR Congo

Kgalema Motlanthe, the South African president, on Sunday called for a ceasefire between Congolese government forces and fighters from the National Congress for the Defence of the People (CNDP).
On Saturday, the UN said it had evidence that CNDP fighters and pro-government militias have killed civilians in the region.

See also: Johann Hari: How we fuel Africa’s bloodiest war

Palestinians forced from ‘UN home’

The family were evicted on Sunday, despite the fact the al-Kurds are still in the midst of appealing against the high court judgment.
Fawzia al-Kurd told news agency AFP: “They arrived at three thirty at the morning. They broke into the house by smashing the door and forcefully threw us out, inhumanely.”

Blood Cells

Coltan in phones exacerbates crisis in the Congo

So what can people do who don’t want to be indirectly fueling a war but aren’t ready to stop using their phones? Carney suggests three things:

1) Call their cell phone manufacturer and ask if their phones contain Congolese coltan.

2) Do what they can to make sure their personal savings or pension money is not invested in companies doing business in the Congo.

3) Support the Congolese people by raising awareness of the war.

Carney also says that recycling cell phones can help by reducing overall demand for coltan. Cell phone recycling services are available in some Canadian cities. Switching phones less often also helps lessen demand.